Yansane - IR/PS312 International Political Economy

SYLLABUS FOR GUIDANCE - INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY IR/PS312 (4units)

College of Behavioral and Social Sciences

Instructor: A. Yansane

NOTA BENE! SYLLABUS IS FOR GUIDANCE ONLY! THE INSTRUCTOR WILL PROVIDE YOU WITH THE MOST RECENT SYLLABUS ON COURSE START DATE!

SCOPE, CONTENT AND EXPECTED LEARNING OUTCOME

The general objective of the course of International Political Economy (IPE) is to examine the mutual interactions of state and market and analyzes the significance of this relationship. It assumes that an understanding of the issues of the expansion of world political economy, international trade, monetary affairs and economic development requires the integration of the theoretical insights of the disciplines of economics and political science. The course will discuss the three (3) prevailing ideologies of the interactions, which interpret the dynamics of the policies of international political economy (i.e., trade, money, finance and taxation, development and investment, and transnational corporations).

The course is multidisciplinary and draws upon economics and political science and policy-oriented materials. The successful completion of this course or the expected learning outcome should enable the students to understand, analyze and assess the issues and problems of the international political economy and their significance in evaluating globalization, regionalism and protectionism.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

The course is offered for four (4) units. There will be four (3) hours of lecture and discussions, everyday. Discussions are an integral part of the course. Sometimes there will be audio-visual illustrations and films. Students will be evaluated on their performance on two brief exams, i.e., a midterm and a final exam, the discussions of assigned readings, two book reviews and short summaries of required readings to be handed in respectively on the 4th, 8th and 12th weeks from the beginning of the Semester.

The objectives of the course are to be reached in large measure by a blend of lectures, extensive reading and class discussions and written book reviews and required readings summaries. The brief exams will be on the reading and the lecture materials. Each student will hand in two book reviews of 7 typewritten pages to be devoted to a topic linked to one of the themes of the course. The two book reviews must be cleared with the instructor. The first review is due on June 13, the second on June 27.

A student can also choose to write one research paper (approximately 20-25 pages) on a topic, the synopsis and outline of which, have been approved by the instructor.

GRADING

The two brief exams will constitute 40 percent of the course grade. They will be on the sixth and 15th weeks. The two book reviews or the final paper will constitute 50 percent of the grade. Class participation and summaries of required readings will make the remaining 10 percent.

REQUIRED READINGS FOR PURCHASE

1) David N. Balaam and Michael Veseth, Introduction to International Political Economy. (Fourth Edition). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Prentice Hall, 2008. (REQUIRED READING BY ALL STUDENTS).

2a) Irwin A. Douglas, Free Trade Under Fire, Princeton and Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2002; or

2b Brian Hocking and Steven McGuire, (Eds.), Trade Politics: International, Domestic and Regional Perspectives. (2nd Edition). London: Routledge, 2004; or

2c) Timothy Joslyn, Donna Roberts and David Orden, Food Regulation and Trade: Toward a Safe and Open Global System. Washington, DC: The Institute for International Economics, 2003; or

2d) Gary Gereffi, David Spencer and Jennifer Bair, (Eds.), Free Trade and Uneven development: The North American Industry After NAFTA. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 2002; or

2e) Gordon Myers, Banana Wars-The Price of Free Trade: A Caribbean Perspective. London: Zed Books, 2004.

3a) Bhagirath Lal Das, The WTO Agreements: Deficiencies, Imbalances and Required Changes. London: Zed Press, 1998; or

3b) Gary P. Sampson, Trade, Environment and the WTO: The Post Seattle Agenda. Washington, DC: The Overseas Development Council, 2000; or

3c) Kent Jones, Who’s Afraid of the WTO? Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004.

4a) David J. Saari, Global Corporations and Sovereign Nations: Collision or Cooperation? Wesport, CT: Quorum Books, 1999; or

4b) Ronnie Garcia-Johnson, Exporting Environmentalism: US Multinational Corporations in Brazil and Mexico. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2000; or

4c) David C. Korten, When Corporations Rule the World. (Second Edition). San Francisco: Kumarian Press, 2001.

5a) Steger Manfred, The New Market Ideology: Globalism. Lanham, Boulder, New York: Rowman & Little Publishers, 2002; or

5b) Robert Gilpin, Global Political Economy: Understanding International Economic Order. Princeton & Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2001; or

5c) International Forum on Globalization (IFG), Alternatives to Globalization: A Better World Is Possible. Washington, DC: IFG, 2001, or

5d) Joseph Stiglitz (JS), Globalization and Its Discontent. Chicago: Uni. Of Chicago Press, 2001.

5e) Jagdish Bhagwati, In Defense of Globalization, New York: Oxford University Press, 2004.

6a) The World Bank, The East Asian Miracle. Washington, DC: The World Bank, 1993; or

6a) T.J. Pempel , (Ed.), The Politics of the Asian Economic Crisis. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1999.

NOTA BENE! SYLLABUS IS FOR GUIDANCE ONLY! THE INSTRUCTOR WILL PROVIDE YOU WITH THE MOST RECENT SYLLABUS ON COURSE START DATE!