Yansane - IR540 Rich and Poor Nations

SYLLABUS FOR GUIDANCE - RICH AND POOR NATIONS: THE NORTH-SOUTH DIALOGUE IR540

Instructor: A.Y. Yansane

NOTA BENE! SYLLABUS IS FOR GUIDANCE ONLY! THE INSTRUCTOR WILL PROVIDE YOU WITH THE MOST RECENT SYLLABUS ON COURSE START DATE!

I. INTRODUCTION: SCOPE, CONTENT AND EXPECTED LEARNING OUTCOMES

The general objective of the course is to examine the socio-economic problems and policies of Third World countries (Africa, Asia, South and Central America) in order to foster an understanding of the major analytical and policy issues surrounding the problems of (under-) development. As such, the course combines and examination of the theoretical and practical aspect of development (general concept, models, structural characteristics, the expansion of world political economy, and the strategies for reversing the process of underdevelopment), with analysis of the social and economic inequalities left behind by the colonial powers, hence the dichotomies of rich and poor nations, industrialized and developing countries, North and South, etc. By taking specific questions such as poverty and population growth in Asia, agrarian crisis in Latin America, agricultural development in Africa, unemployment, industrialization, the modernization debate, social stratification, and income inequality, we will discuss them from both the general perspective of (under-) development theory, and from a perspective which emphasizes the experience of selected Third World countries. The specific objective is to understand the history of a given socio-economic problem as well as critical evaluation of policy prescriptions employed to solve the problem.

This course is a Social Science course which draws upon economic, historical, political, sociological, and policy oriented materials. The successful completion of this course or the expected learning outcome should enable the student to understand and analyze the environmental constraints and opportunities (domestic and foreign) which challenge economic and political development as well as business management in the Third World.

II. COURSE REQUIREMENTS

This course is offered for four units. There will be four hours of lecture and discussions per week. Discussions are an integral part of the course. Sometimes there will be guest lecturers. Students will be evaluated on their performance on brief exams, a mid-term, a final exam, the discussions of the assigned readings, and individual projects or term papers. The objectives of the course are to be reached in large measure by extensive reading and class discussions.

The first two brief exams will cover the readings and lecture materials. Each student will write one research paper (approximately 15-20 pages) on a topic of his/her choice, to be cleared by the instructor before the beginning of the second week of the semester.

A student can also choose (instead of the term paper) three book reviews to be devoted to a topic linked to one of the themes of the course. The three books must be cleared with the instructor before the beginning of the second week of the semester. The first review is due on February 25th, the second review on March 25th, and the third review on April 22nd.

The two brief exams will constitute 40% of the course grade. They will be in the 6th and 10th weeks of class. The final paper will constitute 50% of the grade. Class participation will make the remaining 10%.

III. REQUIRED READINGS

1.A.Y. Yansane, Decolonization and Dependency: Problems of Development of African Societies, Westport, Connecticut and London, England: Greenwood Press, 1980.

OR

A.Y. Yansane, Decolonization of West African States of French Colonial Legacy, Comparison and Contrast: Development on Guinea, The Ivory Coast and Senegal, Cambridge: Schenkman Publication, Copy. 1989.

OR A. Y. Yansane, Prospects for Recovery and Sustainable Development in Africa, Westport, CT & London: Greenwood Press, 1996

OR

A. Y. Yansane, Development Strategies in Africa: Current Economic, Soup-Political and Institutional Trends & Issues, Westport, CT & London: Greenwood Press, 1996

2. McCalla, Agricultural Policies in World Markets, New York: McMillan, 1985.

OR

Albert Hirschman, Essays in Trespassing: Economics, Politics and Beyond, Cambridge: Cambridge U.P. 1984.

OR

Alain de Janvry, The Agrarian Question in Latin America, Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins U.P., 1981.

OR Joel S. Migdal, Peasants, Politics & Revolution, New Jersey: Princeton University Press, 1986

OR

The World Bank, South East Asian Miracle, Washington: The World Bank, 1993.

OR

3. Gerald Meier (Ed.) Leading Issues in Economic Development, N.Y.: Oxford U. Press, 1995.

OR

Warren Baum and Stokes Tolbert, Investing in Development: Lessons of World Bank Experience: Oxford U.Press, 1984.

OR

Hamza Alavi and Teodore Shanin (Ed.) Introduction to the Sociology of Developing Societies, N.Y., & London: Monthly Review Press, 1982.

4. The South Commission, The Challenge to the South, N.Y.: Oxford University Press, 1990.

OR

The South Centre, Facing the Challenge, London & New Jersey: Zed Books, 1993.

OR

International Commission on Peace & Equity, Uncommon Opportunities, Zed Books, 1994

OR

Lester R. Brown et al., The State of the World, New York: WW Norton & Company, 1996

NOTA BENE! SYLLABUS IS FOR GUIDANCE ONLY! THE INSTRUCTOR WILL PROVIDE YOU WITH THE MOST RECENT SYLLABUS ON COURSE START DATE!