McAfee - IR736/SS736 Development and Globalization Seminar

Syllabus for Guidance - IR736/SS736 Development and Globalization Seminar

Kathleen McAfee

NOTA BENE! SYLLABUS IS FOR GUIDANCE ONLY! THE INSTRUCTOR WILL PROVIDE YOU WITH THE MOST RECENT SYLLABUS ON COURSE START DATE!

REQUIRED TEXTS

Richard Peet & Elaine Hartwick 2009 Theories of Development 2nd edition Guilford $32 ISBN 978-1606230657

Ha-Joon Chang 2007 Bad Samaritans: The Myth of Free trade and the Secret History of Capitalism Bloomsbury Press $18 ISBN 9781596913998

RECOMMENDED SUPPLEMENTARY TEXTS:

Katie Willis 2005/20011 Theories and Practice of Development 2nd edition, Routledge 978-0-415-59071-6

Philip Porter & Eric Sheppard 2009 A World of Difference 2nd edition, Guilford Press 978-1-60623-262-0

Peter Dicken 2007 (5th edition) Global Shift: Reshaping the Global Economic Map in the 21st Century Guilford 978-1593854362 Maps, charts, & text provide a comprehensive, up-to-date overview of the global economy.

HOW THIS SEMINAR WORKS

The seminar is led by its participants. Most learning happens through the readings and our critical analyses of them. I will do some lecturing most weeks to introduce new themes, situate the readings in the context of development studies, political economy, and other academic fields, and occasionally share my experiences as an international development professional with OXFAM and other NGOs.

There is a final paper but no exams. Grades are based on your weekly, short written commentaries (30%), participation in seminar discussions (20%), a presentation on your paper-in-progress (10%), and the paper (40%). There’s plenty of reading: about 80-100 pages are required most weeks, a whole (very readable) book one week, and recommended extra reading. You need to set plenty of reading time aside in advance of our meetings. Readings that are not in the texts or easily found via the internet will be posted on iLearn. If you have no background in international development and political economy, you will may need to read some of the material more than once.

Each student writes a 400-500-word commentary on the readings (about 1 single-spaced page) and posts it in the iLearn course page before noon of day the class meets, and preferably the night before. Post your commentary in a separate iLearn forum for each week. You can easily read each others’ contributions after you’ve posted your own and before class. Most people find this very helpful.

(I assume each of you may miss one week’s commentary &/or class due to illness or emergency.)

Students take turns presenting the materials for discussion. Usually a student introduces one article in any session, so by end of term you will have done this 3 - 4 times. You should present a very succinct, 5-7 minute critical analysis and pose a few questions for our discussion. Keeping your presentation with the time limit is crucial so we have time for discussion. Also, it’s more difficult to present a short, sharp analysis than to give a long rambling summary. Learning to do this well is important.

A good presentation will note (briefly) who the author is (background, employment), summarize her/his main points and line of reasoning, mention unstated assumptions, strengths &/or weaknesses, (such as evidence or lack thereof for his/her argument), then note how the authors’ argument confirms or contrasts with other readings, theories, or cases and its relevance to the broader course themes.

We won’t know exactly how many presentations each student will do until we know how many are in the seminar, but look at the syllabus in advance to note readings you’re especially interested in.

Most of the assigned reading is theoretical and general: about development policies and experiences in more than one region. But it’s equally important to be grounded in some knowledge of a particular place and continuously to weigh the arguments and data in the reading in light of what you’re learning about that country or region. Therefore, each participant chooses one country in Africa, Latin America, or Asia by week 3, follows it through your own reading and research during the course, drafts a paper and presents it to the class in one of the last 3 seminars, polishes the paper based on feedback from the group, and submits it (electronically to me) as a final paper of 4000-6000 words.

I will meet with each student individually during office hours or by appointment to give some feedback on your class contributions, help you frame a research question for your paper, suggest research sources if I can, and discuss any issues about the substance and/or the process of the seminar that you wish to raise.

The syllabus is a draft. It won’t change much, but I (or we) may decide to add, subtract, or substitute readings as we see how things are going.

Students with disabilities who need reasonable accommodations are encouraged to contact the instructor. The Disability Programs and Resource Center (DPRC) is available to facilitate the reasonable accommodations process. The DPRC is located in the Student Service Building and can be reached by telephone (voice/TTY 415-338-2472) or by email (dprc@sfsu.edu)

NOTA BENE! SYLLABUS IS FOR GUIDANCE ONLY! THE INSTRUCTOR WILL PROVIDE YOU WITH THE MOST RECENT SYLLABUS ON COURSE START DATE!