McAfee - IR312 International Political Economy

Syllabus for Guidance – IR312 International Political Economy (Spring 2013)

Professor: Kathleen McAfee 4 units

NOTA BENE! SYLLABUS IS FOR GUIDANCE ONLY! THE INSTRUCTOR WILL PROVIDE YOU WITH THE MOST RECENT SYLLABUS ON COURSE START DATE!

Prerequisites

IR308, ENG214, upper-division standing

kmcafee@sfsu.edu

REQUIRED TEXT:

Robert O’Brien & Marc Williams 2010 Global Political Economy 3rd edition Palgrave/MacMillan (± $30-40 new) 978-0230241213 Download study question on iLearn for each assigned text chapter: use for study & bring to class as printouts or on laptop. Bring textbook to classes.

RESOURCES (RECOMMENDED)

Supplements to main textbook; very useful but not required): Dollars & Sense Collective Real World Globalization latest edition, $35 Dollars & Sense Books: buy online Raymond C. Miller 2008 International Political Economy: Contrasting World Views <$35 new <$10 used 978-0415384094

GRADING:

You can earn a total of 1,000 points (or slight more from extras-credit exam Qs). Here’s how: Assignments: = up to 300 points (up to 50 points each for the best 6 of 7 required and graded assignments)

There are 7 assignments. The 1st (Assignment 0) is CR/NC. The others will be graded: There are 4 before the mid-term exam and 3 after the mid-term.

You should do all 7 to improve your comprehension and prepare for exams. This also increases your chance of earning close to 300 points because your lowest grade out of the 7 will be dropped.

You can miss one assignment, but if you submit fewer than 6 graded assignments 20 points will be deducted for each missing assignment in addition to the up-to-50 points that you will already be missing for the assignment.

WARNING! THIS IS AN EASY WAY TO LOWER YOUR GRADE OR EVEN FAIL THE COURSE NEEDLESSLY!

Participation = up to 100 points based on attendance, taking part in discussions and/or iLearn forums Quizzes = up to 100 points Midterm exam = up to 200 points

Final exam = up to 300 points

COURSE LOGISTICS AND TIPS:

Changes

This syllabus is a draft. Some dates may change to accommodate guest speaker or unforeseen events. You’ll be notified by email & iLearn. Check iLearn to be sure you’re following the latest syllabus or to download an extra copy.

Attendance.

We take attendance because experience has shown that it is difficult to pass this class if you miss more than two of the lectures and films. Don’t expect to be counted if you arrive after role has been taken. In cases of serious, documented emergencies, we'll try to accommodate your needs.

Graduate Teaching Assistants:

will provide feedback and help grade your assignments, lead pre-exam review sessions, and answer questions out of class. Please respect their time constraints when requesting help, but DO take advantage of their availability. They are here to help you.

iLearn:

is your source for the additional required & optional readings. You can read them online or –better– print the readings for yourself to high- light or underline. ILearn staff can advise you. ILearn allows you & the instructors to keep track of your progress & maintain a record of your grades.

Assignments:

You should complete 3 assignments (1, 2, & 3) before the mid-term and 4 after the mid-term. Your lowest 1 grade will be dropped. If you submit fewer than 6 assignments, 20 points will be deducted for each one missing – an easy way to fail. (See explanation of grading above). Late assignments cannot be accepted except in cases of documented emergencies. This is to be fair to the instructor, TAs, & your fellow students. To give you flexibility they are due on iLearn by SUNDAY 2 PM, but that doesn’t mean you should wait until Sunday to do them!

Assignments (not exams) are handled digitally (iLearn). You must upload your written work on iLearn. That’s how we read and grade your work & make comments for you. Preferred formats are MSWord or .rtf. You can use .pdf or plain text formats if you must. Avoid .wpd or .wps formats -

Quizzes:

There may be two or more quizzes during the semester on the assigned reading for any particular day. Some may be pop quizzes. Exams: The midterm and final will comprise a combination of short essay, short answer, and multiple choice questions. No blue books are needed.

Reading:

You really do have to do it to do understand the lectures, pass pop quizzes, do well on assignments and exams, and get a decent grade. You won’t need to read every page of the all chapters in O’Brien & Williams. The required chapters and pages are specified in the syllabus. Taking notes and listing new terms and concepts will help you stay awake and remember the material.

Bring your textbook to class, especially the class sessions when we will be discussing a textbook chapter, as indicated on the syllabus.

Real World Globalization is a supplementary text with short, punchy articles by Dollars and Sense magazine's Editorial Collective. The assigned articles and others in the book can help give an overview of what’s a stake in the debates about IPE before you read O’Brien & Williams chapters. The on-line articles by the Center for Popular Economics (some are in the syllabus) is another good source of easier-to-digest information.

International Political Economy: Contrasting World Views was written by Emeritus SFSU IR professor Raymond C. Miller after nearly 40 years teaching this course.. It is a superb summary of liberal, institutionalist, & Marxist approaches & their real-world applications.

Videos:

They deal with important themes of the class. There will be specific exam questions on most or all of the videos.

Participation

is important. You can’t get an A unless you attend regularly. Speak up in discussions! If you have trouble doing this, before you come to class, plan at least one thing to say even if it’s just a question. If you’re still shy, speak to the instructor and/or the TA. We’ll help you. Every class has students who like to talk and feel at ease doing so. If you’re one of them, great! But keep your points brief to give others a chance.

Office hours:

are for your benefit. If work or class schedule conflicts prevent you from coming at the stated times, the instructor or a TA can usually make an appointment with you at a mutually convenient time and place. Send one of us an email with IR312 in the subject line.

E-mail:

Schedule changes and other announcements will be sent to the address you use when you enroll. If you use a different email address, be sure to have your SFSU email forwarded to that address and check it regularly. The instructor or TA will try to answer your e-mailed questions.

Students with disabilities who need reasonable accommodations are encouraged to contact the instructor. The Disability Programs & Resource Center facilitates the accommodations process. The DPRC in SSB 110 can be reached by phone at 338-2724 (voice/TTY) or e-mail dprc@sfsu.edu.

Plagiarism will result at least in failure of the assignment and possibly failure of the class or expulsion from the university. You should review what constitutes plagiarism: Plagiarism - The Do's and Don'ts and IUB - Plagiarism.

NOTA BENE! SYLLABUS IS FOR GUIDANCE ONLY! THE INSTRUCTOR WILL PROVIDE YOU WITH THE MOST RECENT SYLLABUS ON COURSE START DATE!