Banerjee - IR326 Foreign Relations of South and South East Asia

Syllabus for Guidance – IR326 Foreign Relations of South and Southeast Asia (Fall 2012)

Prof. Sanjoy Banerjee

NOTA BENE! SYLLABUS IS FOR GUIDANCE ONLY! THE INSTRUCTOR WILL PROVIDE YOU WITH THE MOST RECENT SYLLABUS ON COURSE START DATE!

The purpose of this class is to immerse students in the international relations of southern Asia. This region stretches from Afghanistan to the Philippines. It includes India, a rising democratic power that still contains the world’s largest reservoir of poverty; Pakistan, which contains the world’s largest pool of non-state religious fighters and a complex political order; and Singapore, one of the wealthiest countries in the world. The region contains one in four human beings.

The course will examine international politics, economic development, and sociopolitical evolution in South Asia. It will survey the politics and economics of Southeast Asia. IR 326 is part of the following Segment III General Education (Category B: Institutional and Social Themes) clusters: (i) Asian societies, politics, and culture and (ii) Islamic Societies and Cultures.

Prerequisites published in the SFSU Bulletin for IR 326 are ENG 214 and upper division standing. The instructor reserves the right to drop any student who does not meet the prerequisites.

The class will focus on a set of readings, a midterm exam, a presentation, and a term paper. The readings are mostly articles from research journals. These are the most advanced readings in International Relations and related disciplines. Undergraduate students should expect to read such articles at least twice for adequate comprehension.

The presentation should use Power Point or compatible presentation software, with about 15 slides. The slides should contain a table of the kind shown below, an outline of points, and data in a suitable format. All quotes and data should be cited as footnotes on the same slide. Most presentations will receive feedback in class, please do take notes on feedback to your own presentation and to others.

The term paper should be 4750 words long. The paper must present a supported and an opposed hypothesis. Both should be taken from academic or journalistic sources. The readings assigned in this syllabus may not be used for either hypothesis. These should disagree on at least three theoretical or broad factual questions (not moral or policy questions). It must then present an argument, combining theory and data, supporting the right and opposing the wrong hypotheses. The works used for the hypotheses may not be used for the data.

You can access the assigned journal articles through Google Scholar. Just enter the author name and some words from the title. You can access academic journals through the Electronic Journals List. For your research, Google, Google Book Search, and Google Scholar are very useful. A very large world-wide compendium of news articles over the last two decades is available in Lexis-Nexis through: Articles and Databases. Google News is also a good source for news reports.

Plagiarism on all assignments and exams is strictly prohibited. A definition of plagiarism of the University of North Carolina, valid for this class, is available at:

Plagiarism - The Writing Center. Any plagiarism will entail failure on the assignment and possible referral to the SFSU Judicial Officer.

It is vital that you back up your writing on to storage media separate from your computer. Loss of work for any reason will not be accepted as an excuse for delay in the submission of assignments.

In both the presentation and the paper, the argument should be summarized in a table as below:

Summary Table
  Right hypothesis Wrong hypothesis Data
Quesiton 1 Yes. Quote. No. Quote. Yes. Summary.
Quesiton 2 Yes. Quote. No. Quote. Yes. Summary.
Quesiton 2 Yes. Quote. No. Quote. Yes. Summary.

The paper is due as an e-mail attachment by the start of our meeting during the final exam period. Only documented medical excuses for delay will be accepted.

Grading:

midterm exam 30%, presentation 20%, term paper 40%, class participation 10%.

Texts:

Farzana Shaikh, Making sense of Pakistan, 2009

Sumit Ganguly and Rahul Mukherji, India since 1980, 2011 (available in Kindle)

Please access all assigned readings in journals though Electronic Journals List. Some readings will be e-mailed to your sfsu.edu address.

Please e-mail me if you have difficulty getting to any assigned reading after 15 minutes of effort and I will e-mail it to you.

NOTA BENE! SYLLABUS IS FOR GUIDANCE ONLY! THE INSTRUCTOR WILL PROVIDE YOU WITH THE MOST RECENT SYLLABUS ON COURSE START DATE!